STL Index for: Charles W. Lynde

Dr. Charles Lynde is a recognized figure in Canadian dermatology and recipient of the Award of Merit by the Canadian Dermatology Association. He is the director of the Dermatology Update conference, medical director of Lynde Dermatology and Lynderm Research, and has authored over 150 articles, and is a regular contributor to SkinTherapyLetter. His research interests include psoriasis, acne, psoriatic arthritis, as well as cosmetic dermatology.

Hair Removal Practices: A Literature Review

This article is a general overview of hair removal practices, which have evolved from utilizing waxes and blades, to advanced lasers and electrolysis, with further advancements still being studied

Moisturizers and Cleansers in the Management of Skin Conditions Caused by Personal Protective Equipment and Frequent Handwashing

Routine moisturization with non-irritating, pH-adjusted, ceramide-based products and gentle cleansing with a pH-adjusted cleanser can treat the unique dermatological challenges posed by COVID-19.

Prurigo Nodularis: Review and Emerging Treatments

Novel therapeutics are currently being explored for the treatment of Prurigo Nodularis. Nemolizumab and dupilumab both demonstrate promise in inhibiting specific central nervous system pathways responsible for transmission of the pruritic sensation.

Canadian Skin Management in Oncology (CaSMO) Algorithm for Patients With Oncology Treatment-Related Skin Toxicities

The CaSMO (Canadian Skin Management in Oncology) algorithm focuses on general skincare measures to prevent or reduce the severity of cancer-treatment-related cutaneous toxicities.

Use of Topical Crisaborole for Treating Dermatitis in a Variety of Dermatology Settings

The discussed cases reflect the panels’ real-world clinical experience with crisaborole for the treatment of patients with AD and the off-label treatment of irritant dermatitis.

Hormonal Treatment of Acne in Canada: Clinical Update and Case-Based Treatment Approaches

Evolving understanding of the role of hormones in acne, along with a growing body of data from clinical trials, calls for a reappraisal of the role of hormonal therapy for acne.

Chronic Urticaria: Following Practice Guidelines

Urticaria is a common, mast-cell-driven disease, characterized clinically by the development of wheals, angioedema, or both. A large body of data has demonstrated that omalizumab, a biologic agent, is safe and effective in the treatment of H1- antihistamine refractory urticaria and should be considered as a third-line agent, with cyclosporin A reserved for fourth-line therapy.

Atopic Dermatitis: A Practical Guide to Management

A group of dermatologists with extensive experience in managing pediatric and adult patients with atopic dermatitis developed practical recommendations for the management of atopic dermatitis based on expert consensus opinion and the best available medical evidence.

Chronic Hand Dermatitis: Case-based Approaches to Management

Practical guidelines for the management of Chronic Hand Dermatitis were published in the Skin Therapy Letter, Family Practice Edition (October 2016). This series of cases using Alitretinoin (Toctino®), is a follow on to that publication to put the guidelines into context.

Tofacitinib in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Chronic Plaque Psoriasis

Tofacitinib is an oral immunosuppressant approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is currently undergoing investigation (Phase III trials) for treating chronic plaque psoriasis.

Management of Chronic Hand Dermatitis: A Practical Guideline for the General Practitioner

Hand Dermatitis can have a significant impact on quality of life. It may interfere with activities both at work and in the home and can be associated with social and psychological distress. This article provides helpful practical guidance for the general practitioner in the management of patients with Hand Dermatitis.

Acitretin Revisited

Acitretin over the last 20 years has proven useful in a number of dermatologic diseases. Evidence of efficacy, side-effect profile, and approach to its use will be reviewed.

Predictive Testing of the Melanocortin 1 Receptor for Skin Cancer and Photoaging

Genetic predisposition to melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer extends far beyond the Fitzpatrick phenotype classification scheme. Testing aimed at improving prognostication may serve to limit the influence of certain risk factors.

Moisturizers: An Essential Component in Eczema Management

Atopic dermatitis (AD) or eczema is a chronic, relapsing form of skin inflammation that is attributable to multiple pathogenic, genetic, and environmental factors, as well as a dysfunctional epidermal barrier. Immune responses involved in AD culminate in dry skin, pruritus, and IgE mediated sensitization to food and environmental allergens.

Novel Agents for Intractable Itch

There exists a multitude of medical conditions that cause intractable itch, or pruritus. These novel antipruritic agents will be explored in this review.

Skin Care as an Adjunct Treatment for Skin Disease

This article describes how pharmacists can play an important role in providing for patients with their skin concerns and counselling patients on effective management and behavioral strategies as well as prescribing. Reactive and proactive communication approaches are described.

Hyperpigmentation and Its Topical Treatments

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and melasma are common problems that dermatologists see. Various bleaching options are considered.

Topical Treatments for Melasma and Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation

Hyperpigmentation disorders of the skin are common and can be the source of significant psychosocial distress for patients. Topical applications are the mainstay of treatment and include phenols, retinoids, corticosteroids, and their combinations.

Herpes Labialis (Cold Sores)

Cold sores can be an embarrassment. They can provide a source of herpes that can autoinoculate into the eye as well as infect others. In atopic dermatitis it can be become very widespread and can also produce erythema multiforme.

Moisturizers: What They Are and a Practical Approach to Product Selection

Moisturizers are widely used products that are important in many dermatologic and cosmetic skin therapies. They contain varying combinations of emollients, occlusives, and humectants to achieve their beneficial effects, and there is an overwhelming number of formulations available.

Moisturizers: What They Are And How They Work

Moisturizers are widely used in various dermatologic and cosmetic skin therapies. Different classes of moisturizers are based on their mechanism of action, including occlusives, humectants, emollients and protein rejuvenators.

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