STL Index for: Estradiol

Hormonal Treatment of Acne in Canada: Clinical Update and Case-Based Treatment Approaches

Evolving understanding of the role of hormones in acne, along with a growing body of data from clinical trials, calls for a reappraisal of the role of hormonal therapy for acne.

The New Canadian Guideline for Acne Treatment

Physicians will be particularly reassured if the suggested guidelines are supported by scientific evidence. This new Canadian clinical guideline for the treatment of acne was developed taking into account new data published up to March 2015, as well as expert opinion and clinical experience.

The Health Controversies of Parabens

Parabens are preservatives used in a variety of personal care, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food products. Discovery of parabens in the breast tissue of patients with breast cancer has raised public concern over their use. This article discusses the controversy, research, regulations, and possible alternatives.

The Health Controversies of Parabens

It is hypothesized that the estrogenic properties of parabens may play a role in breast cancer development. At this point, there is an insufficient amount of data suggesting serious consequences from paraben use and exposure to warrant drastic avoidance measures or government regulations.

Age-related Percutaneous Penetration Part 2: Effect of Age on Dermatopharmacokinetics and Overview of Transdermal Products

Transdermal drug delivery allows for a constant rate of drug administration. This second part highlights the importance of elderly patient care, and consideration for patients who may be using multiple drug treatments.

Acne Treatment: Birth Control Pills And Other Hormone Therapy

Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been available since 1960, and can be useful for treating certain types of acne. Various acne-approved OCs are discussed.

New Developments in Hormonal Therapy for Acne (FP Edition)

The proven therapeutic benefits of OCs offer a valuable option to physicians for the treatment of acne. The accumulating evidence on the efficacy and safety of recently available drospirenone-containing hormonal preparations provides dermatologists with a new option for the treatment of acne and other hyperandrogenic disorders.

New Developments in Hormonal Therapy for Acne (Pharmacist Edition)

Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been used for many years by dermatologists as a treatment option for women with acne. The proven therapeutic benefits of OCs extend a valuable alternative to physicians for the treatment of acne.

New Developments in Hormonal Therapy for Acne

Oral contraceptives (OCs) are a valuable option for the treatment of women with acne. The use of OCs can be considered across the spectrum of acne disease severity in women. In Canada, three preparations are approved for mild-to-moderate acne, and a fourth is indicated for severe acne.

Diane-35 (Cyproterone Acetate and Ethinyl Estradiol) Overview

Diane-35 (Cyproterone Acetate and Ethinyl Estradiol), its indications, and clinical experience are discussed. Patient profiles, suitable and unsuitable candidates are also discussed.

Hormonal Agents Approved for Treatment of Acne

Hormonal agents are important, effective therapeutic options for women across the spectrum of acne severity. The three preparations approved in Canada for this indication have safety profiles similar to conventional oral contraceptives.

The Use Of Low Dose Oral Contraceptives for the Management of Acne

There is compelling evidence that oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in the management of mild-moderate acne vulgaris, as well as cumulative evidence that elevated levels of androgens in acne patients, relative to appropriate controls, are an underlying pathophysiological factor in acne.

Vulvovaginal Dryness and Itching

Dryness and itching in the vulvovaginal area is an increasing problem as our female population ages and becomes menopausal. This dryness and itching is often the result of estrogen deficiency, and there are typically two types of treatment: Specific Therapy (or hormone replacement therapy), and Nonspecific Therapy.

Oral Contraceptives in the Treatment of Acne

Oral contraceptives (OCs) can reduce acne by lowering the production of adrenal and ovarian androgens, by inhibiting 5- alpha-reductase, which in turn, reduces the levels of dihydrotestosterone, and by stimulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), thus reducing the levels of free testosterone.

Perspectives on Isotretinoin and the Canadian Consensus Guidelines on Treatment of Acne

Treatment objectives and pharmacoeconomic considerations are important when developing guidelines that are effective and rational. Canadian Acne Treatment Guidelines were last published in 1995. New guidelines were recently developed to incorporate therapeutic advances and data from more recent studies.

Focus on Diane-35®

Diane-35®, known as Dianette® in some countries, is a combination of cyproterone acetate 2 mg and ethinyl estradiol 0.035 mg. It has recently received regulatory clearance in Canada, but has not yet been approved by the US FDA.

Drug Treatments Introduced in 1998

Drug Treatments Introduced in 1998

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