STL Index for: Rivers K. Jason

Dr. Jason K. Rivers is a familiar face in media, national and international symposia, and the medical director of Pacific Derm. He has lectured and published extensively on skin cancer and devoted significant efforts to research and collaboration on various government and industry-sponsored initiatives in prevention and treatment. Dr. Rivers’ experience in laser surgery and aesthetic medicine spans more than 25 years. From 2005-2015 he was the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery; he is the immediate past president of the Canadian Society for Dermatologic Surgery and the current president of Acne and Rosacea Society of Canada. Dr. Rivers constantly strives to be among the leaders in his field, most recently, by creating a new state-of the-art centre that represents a veritable integration of both medical dermatology and aesthetic medicine.

Non-Invasive Gene Expression Testing to Rule Out Melanoma

The Pigmented Lesion Assay (PLA) is a gene expression test that helps rule out melanoma and has the potential to reduce the need for surgical biopsies of atypical pigmented skin lesions.

Actikerall™ (5-Fluorouracil 0.5% and Salicylic Acid 10%) Topical Solution for Patient-directed Treatment of Actinic Keratoses (Family Practice)

Actinic keratosis, a common cutaneous lesion with the potential to transform into squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, a topical formulation Actikerall, combining 0.5% 5-fluorouracil with 10% salicylic acid (5-FU-SA) has been made commercially available in Canada. We discuss their merits.

Actikerall™ (5-Fluorouracil 0.5% and Salicylic Acid 10%) Topical Solution for Patient-directed Treatment of Actinic Keratoses

A topical formulation combining 0.5% 5-fluorouracil with 10% salicylic acid (5-FU-SA) was introduced in Europe under the trade name Actikerall™ for the treatment of AKs. Now commercially available in Canada, 5-FU-SA represents a patient applied therapeutic option. Clinical trial data is considered.

The Role of Cosmeceuticals in Antiaging Therapy

As baby boomers get older, they have shown an increasing interest in maintaining a youthful appearance. This paper reviews the more common cosmeceutical ingredients.

The Role of Cosmeceuticals in Anti-Aging Therapy

As baby boomers get older, they have shown an increasing interest in maintaining a youthful appearance. As a result, there has been a corresponding increase in topical antiaging formulations, which are commonly referred to as cosmeceuticals.

Hair Care

Implementing basic proper hair care is essential to maintaining healthy hair. Furthermore, minimizing exposure to chemical agents, inadvisable grooming techniques, and prolonged exposure to environmental elements, will promote healthier hair and avoid unnecessary hair loss.

Imiquimod 5% Cream for the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (AKs) are premalignant inflammatory skin lesions with the potential to transform into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). There are several treatment options available for patients presenting with multiple AKs. Imiquimod is believed to stimulate and enhance host immune responses locally against skin tumors and viral infections.

Topical 3% Diclofenac in 2.5% Hyaluronan Gel for the Treatment of Actinic Keratoses

Many of the treatment options available can cause discomfort, pain or skin irritation. Topical 3% diclofenac in 2.5% hyaluronan gel (Solaraze™, Bioglan Pharma) is a relatively new treatment that has been shown to be effective and well tolerated for the treatment of AKs.

N-2-butylcyanoacrylate (GluStitch™)

Cyanoacrylates are surgical adhesives that provide another option for wound closure. There are a number of surgical adhesives either currently available or under development. The presently available butylcyanoacrylates and octylcyanoacrylates are reviewed.

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