STL Index for: Tacrolimus

Update on the Management of Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a psychosocially debilitating disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. Patients should be made aware of all of the options available geared at repigmentation and depigmentation prior to formulating a treatment plan.

Atopic Dermatitis: A Practical Guide to Management

A group of dermatologists with extensive experience in managing pediatric and adult patients with atopic dermatitis developed practical recommendations for the management of atopic dermatitis based on expert consensus opinion and the best available medical evidence.

Management of Chronic Hand Dermatitis: A Practical Guideline for the General Practitioner

Hand Dermatitis can have a significant impact on quality of life. It may interfere with activities both at work and in the home and can be associated with social and psychological distress. This article provides helpful practical guidance for the general practitioner in the management of patients with Hand Dermatitis.

Off-Label Uses of Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors

Topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) have been proposed as an alternative, long-term treatment option to topical corticosteroids. Currently, TCIs are only approved for treatment of atopic dermatitis in patients 2 years of age or older. This article reviews the off-label uses of TCIs and their efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous diseases.

Regulating Off-label Promotion of Medications: Has the Pendulum Swung Too Far?

Prescribing medications off-label is commonplace in dermatology. This article discusses the recent FDA policy chances, the debate on free speech, the benefits and risks of off label drug use and promotion, and how it relates to patient care.

Sirolimus: A Therapeutic Advance for Dermatologic Disease

Sirolimus, also known as rapamycin (SRL, Rapamune®), was approved in 1999 by the US Food and Drug Administration to prevent graft rejection in renal transplantation. This articles reviews Sirolimus, its pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, and indication.

Modifying the Course of Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition. It has a relapsing course characterized by flare-ups of acute eczema on a background of chronically dry skin. The association of atopic dermatitis (AD) with asthma and allergic rhinitis is referred to as the atopic triad.

A New Paradigm Shift in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis (Pediatric Edition)

This article reviews atopic dermatitis, and its shift in the philosophy behind treatment and management. Preventative therapy, long-term strategy, and focus on quality of life.

Atopic Dermatitis: The Skin Barrier and the Role of Ceramides (Pediatric Edition)

This article discusses atopic dermatitis, its pathogenesis, and general treatment principles as well as specific therapeutic options.

A New Paradigm Shift in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic eczema (or atopic dermatitis) is a common inflammatory skin condition that dermatologists, pediatricians, family physicians, and primary-care providers see on a daily basis. Treatments, mechanism of action, preventative therapies, and the skin barrier are discussed.

Topical Management of Recalcitrant Psoriasis and Eczema

Psoriasis and eczema, especially atopic eczema, are two of the most common cutaneous conditions seen by family physicians and dermatologists. This article discusses the etiology of psoriasis and eczema, immunologic abnormalities, and the role of immune mediators.

Atopic Dermatitis: The Skin Barrier and the Role of Ceramides

This paper examines the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, the skin barrier, and the role that ceramides can play in therapy.

A New Paradigm Shift in the Management of Atopic Dermatitis (Pharmacist Edition)

Atopic eczema is a chronic condition and a long view is necessary for disease control and management. This article discusses the important role of the skin barrier and how it may be a target for therapeutics in treating atopic eczema.

Therapeutic Advances in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

A variety of novel therapeutic modalities have recently become available for patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). Here, we offer a brief overview of these agents and discuss their place in the spectrum of current therapies for CTCL.

Update on Drugs and Drug News: January 2011

Update on drugs, approval dates, and comments. Calcipotriene/Calcipotriol0.005% foam (Sorilux™), Ceftaroline fosamil (Teflaro™) are covered as well as an update on Health Canada on the use of tacrolimus (Protopic®) for atopic dermatitis.

Topical Management of Rosacea

This article reviews the various subtypes of rosacea, their clinical presentations, and the considerations in choosing the optimal therapeutic options. The importance of tailored treatment is discussed as well as topical therapies.

Therapeutic Update on Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a recurrent, usually mild, skin disorder with typical clinical manifestations. This article will review the available treatments for this common dermatologic problem.

Pruritus: Control of Itch in Patients Undergoing Dialysis

Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus is a significant clinical symptom affecting more than 50% of patients on hemodialysis. Treatment of Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus should be undertaken according to individual benefit-risk ratio assessments.

Use of Tacrolimus Ointment in Vitiligo Alone or in Combination Therapy

Current treatments for vitiligo are largely unsatisfactory. Topical corticosteroids and phototherapy (narrow-band UVB and psoralen+UVA) are the most prescribed, however, these therapies are often not effective and have important side-effect, especially when used for a long time.

New and Existing Therapeutic Options for Hand Eczema

Hand eczema affects up to 10% of the population and encompasses a diverse range of morphological presentations and underlying pathophysiological processes. This article will review the new and existing treatments that are available for this common dermatologic problem.

Rosacea and Its Topical Management

Many options exist for the treatment of rosacea, including topical and systemic therapies, laser and light-based therapies, and surgical procedures. The goals of therapy include reduction of papules, pustules, erythema, physical discomfort, and an improvement in quality of life.

Topical Therapy for the Management of Childhood Psoriasis: Part I

Psoriasis represents a potentially life-altering disease that can profoundly impact physical, emotional and social functioning, and overall quality of life. Part I of this 2-part series will focus on topical agents, their varying degrees of effectiveness, potential side-effects and applications in clinical practice.

An Update on New and Emerging Options for the Treatment of Vitiligo

Vitiligo is an acquired leukoderma that results from the loss of epidermal melanocytes, and is characterized by macules and patches of depigmented skin. With a relatively high rate of prevalence, vitiligo occurs in localized, generalized, or segmental patterns; it can run a rapidly progressive course or remain stationary.

Topical Immunomodulators

This article discusses the role of topical immunomodulators in the treatment of eczema. Pimecrolimus 1% Cream (Elidel®) and Tacrolimus (Protopic®) are discussed at length.

Dermatological Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Atypical presentations of typical dermatological conditions are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This article will focus on three specific topics: eosinophilic folliculitis, psoriasis, and cutaneous mycoses. Their unique presentations in HIV and treatments are discussed.

Dermatological Drug Use in Pregnancy

Medications that are considered safe in pregnancy are available for the treatment of common dermatological disorders. Knowledge of these medications is important when considering treatment options for both pregnant patients, and women of childbearing potential.

Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors—Efficacy and Safety in Atopic Dermatitis

TCIs have an important place in the therapeutic armamentarium for AD. They are approved as second line agents for individuals >2 years of age, and have a good safety profile when used short-term or intermittently long-term.

Elidel (Pimecrolimus) Side Effects, Safety and Risks

Elidel (Pimecrolimus), its side effects, safety, and risks are discussed in this article. Various potential risks are discussed and debated.

Management and Treatment of Pruritus

Pruritus, or itch, is a common sensation that causes a person to want to scratch. It is a complex process that may negatively impact quality of life. This overview provides information regarding the various management and treatment options for pruritus.

A Practical Guide to Dermatological Drug Use in Pregnancy

Although the developing fetus was once considered protected from the outside world, we now know that it can potentially be affected by any medication given to the mother. Therapeutic options available for these patients will be discussed.

Pimecrolimus 1% Cream for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a highly pruritic inflammatory disorder of the skin characterized by onset in infancy or childhood and a chronically relapsing course. Mainstay treatments are emollients and topical corticosteroids, but the latter are limited by side-effects from longterm use.

Pimecrolimus and Tacrolimus: The US FDA Public Health Advisory

In February of this year, the US FDA issued a public health advisory to inform healthcare providers and patients about a potential cancer risk from the topical use of pimecrolimus (Elidel©, Novartis), approved by the FDA in December 2001, and tacrolimus (Protopic©, Astellas, formerly Fujisawa), approved in December 2000.

Tacrolimus Ointment (Protopic®) for Atopic Dermatitis

Tacrolimus ointment (Protopic®, Fujisawa) is an effective agent in a class of topical immunomodulators. It has been shown to be safe and effective in adults and children with Atopic Dermatitis in short- and long-term treatments.

Management of the Ichthyoses

The ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of inherited scaling skin disorders that can also affect other organs. Management should be directed at both the skin and other sites. Skin therapy is not specific at this time, although new products may offer more directed therapy in the future.

Treatment of Hand Eczema

Hand eczema is a common skin disease that tends to become chronic and may interfere with many types of work. Emollients have been shown to be useful in reducing eczema activity and in the primary prevention of hand eczema.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis in Children: A Practical Approach to Management

Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) may account for at least 20% of all childhood dermatitis. Clinically, its morphology is identical to other forms of dermatitis in acute, subacute and chronic forms. A persistent or unusual and localized pattern is often the key to diagnosis.

Pimecrolimus 1% Cream (Elidel®) For Atopic Dermatitis

Pimecrolimus is an immunomodulating medication that inhibits production of inflammatory cytokines in the skin and this compound was specifically developed for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

Common Sense Dermatological Drug Suggestions For Women Who Are Breast-feeding

Use of medications by breast-feeding mothers is not uncommon. Information regarding the safety of common dermatological medications during lactation will be reviewed. Based on this information, treatment recommendations will be made.

Update on Drugs and Drug News: January 2001

Update on: Lamivudine, Zidovudine and Abacavir Trizivir Loratidine Claritin Amlexanox 5% paste AptheraBotulinum toxin type B Myobloc

Topical Tacrolimus

Currently, tacrolimus is emerging as a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of a number of dermatological diseases that have in common an aberrant immunologic response. This topical ointment is the first of its kind to be approved by the US FDA (December 2000), 0.1% for the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in adults, and 0.03% for children older than 2 years of age and for adults who are undergoing long-term intermittent therapy.

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