Pruritus

Read articles about pruritis, how it functions, and its management.

Chronic Pruritus: A Review of Neurophysiology and Associated Immune Neuromodulatory Treatments

Chronic pruritus remains a difficult condition to treat with many non-specific therapeutic options. Recent scientific discoveries have elucidated the physiology associated with pruritus.

Pruritus: Control of Itch in Patients Undergoing Dialysis

Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus is a significant clinical symptom affecting more than 50% of patients on hemodialysis. Treatment of Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus should be undertaken according to individual benefit-risk ratio assessments.

Vulvovaginal Dryness and Itching

Dryness and itching in the vulvovaginal area is an increasing problem as our female population ages and becomes menopausal. This dryness and itching is often the result of estrogen deficiency, and there are typically two types of treatment: Specific Therapy (or hormone replacement therapy), and Nonspecific Therapy.

Systemic Drugs With Antipruritic Potency

There are no specific antipruritic drugs on the market, but there are a high number of case reports and experimental investigations describing medications with antipruritic potency. It is therefore the aim of this article to review the major systemic antipruritic drugs and give a short overview on the different types of pruritus.

Novel Agents for Intractable Itch

There exists a multitude of medical conditions that cause intractable itch, or pruritus. These novel antipruritic agents will be explored in this review.

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